Aug 24, 2009


Omari Hardwick
 
 

"All my life I've only brought sisters home to meet my family, but my ex-girlfriend who I dated for three years happened to be Native American and German. When I brought her home, my mother and family embraced her. Last November, we lost our baby and she sacrificed a lot because her family pretty much disowned her because she was dating me, and in the end it didn't work out. But, just because I happened to date outside of my race, it doesn't mean I'm running away from sisters. I have a younger sister who I think is perfect—beautiful and educated. What I think sisters need to understand is that a real brother like myself knows that no one can compare to a sister. We're not sitting around with the boys and when a sister walks by, thinking, "I love that sister across the street, but I'm going to go and holler at this White girl." I consider myself a real brother, and there's nothing more that I appreciate than the swag and sway in a Black woman's security—that is just a little untouchable.

And just to clarify: there's a difference between a Black woman and a sister. President Barack Obama has a sister as his First Lady, and I love him for that. The difference is that a sister understands that she has insecurities, but has the courage and strength to say let's be proactive and continue our African-American sisterhood by not moonwalking backwards, but moving forward by staying empowered. So if there's a brother on the block who ain't checking for her she realizes what side of the block he's walking on and whether or not he's the good brother that God would send to allow her to be a good woman. A Black woman won't be able to make that distinction because she's searching for all the wrong things.

 
 
So, what do you ladies think about what Mr. Hardwick had to say?  I know you all have an opinion on the subject matter.  And, can someone please break down the 'Sister vs. Black Woman' comparison.  I didn't get it.  I need someone to elaborate for me because I don't know where the brother was trying to go with that one.

9 comments:

  1. What he's saying is a compliment. And I understood by thinking the black woman should be the more "positive" and sister the "negative". Deducing it couldn't be that way, made me understand. Meaning a black woman may miss the sign and struggle attesting, judging against it, and a sister would go with the flow, circumventing her spirit.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Although Omari appears to be educated and well-spoken, his comment on the distinction between a “black women” and a “sister” is lacking substance. Without insight to the full question and his full interview, it is not apparent to me what question he was addressing. However based on the limited response posted, his response indicates that he clearly has some inaccurate presumptions about black women.

      In addition he highlighted characteristics about a black woman that can be perceived as a level of prejudice and generalization about black women. Referencing having a younger educated and beautiful sister is irrelevant to the topic since his sister’s existence was not by his choice, hence having a younger sister does not justify and/or prove that he genuinely has an appreciation for black women as a whole. I wonder if he has levels of classification to describe and distinguish between “white/non-black women, or even a distinguish between a black-man and a bother?”

      To summarize, his comment suggests that he prefers woman in general that have insecurities but can miraculously stay empowered (I wonder how insecure women stay empowed?). He appears to appreciate the physical swag and swing of a black woman – however that demonstrates security – which apparently is a negative since it means that she can not distinguish between a “sister” and a “black woman”, hence as a result according to Omari “she's searching for all the wrong things.”

      Omari, is an intelligent and talented person, however I think he may want to re-think his thoughts on this particular topic to better prepare himself to provide more detail and/or research evidence of such distinction between a “black woman and a sister.”

      Delete
  2. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I hear what he's saying. And I don't doubt his sincerity. But that doesn't address the brothers who are actively, purposefully seeking out non-black women, and who don't have the courage to say, "I just like that fact that their hair is longer and straighter and/or that their skin is lighter and I get more 'prop' for having her on my arm"....If they would just be honest about it and not try to blame it all on the sisters then we might be able to move forward in discussing this topic.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Omari Hardwick is beautiful...I saw him for the first time in the movie "Kick Ass" and almost dropped my popcorn! I was sitting there, looking silly, with my mouth wide open. I know that the people sitting around me were like, "what is wrong with her?" :-)..There is nothing like a beautiful, loving, strong black man!

    ReplyDelete
  5. My sentiments exactly. Same thing happened to me only I was at home browsing television and came across the show Dark Blue... I was shocked that after I googled him I realized he is old like mid 30's and I really don't do old, but he is SEXY. I would do him...lol Oh that is so wrong at so many levels, I love my husband, but he would be a tempation for me...

    ReplyDelete
  6. What he is saying makes no sense. I do not view it as a compliment. How can one distinguish between a "black woman" and a "sista" Exactly what is that distinction? It just seems to me as a justification for his preferring to be with other non-black women, and that is fine, as long as he is not attacking us (black women/sistahs).

    Whatever his dating preference is, it is his business. I just happened to see him in Tyler Perry's movie and wondered who he was. Only ask that he and others like him, do not use foolish statements, and justifications for what they prefer in terms in the physicality of their partners.

    Peace.

    ReplyDelete
  7. I first saw this beautiful man in Linewatch with Cuba Gooding Jr, and then again in Next Day Air with Mike Epps, this man is a wonderful actor, poet, and he played football before injuring his knee, let's not slip on this fine black man, he speaks eloquently and confirmed his love for his African American women, he's a far cry from Wesley Snipes -beliefs and acting, and I can't wait to see more of him- oh and mid 30's is not old! lol

    ReplyDelete
  8. Although Omari appears to be educated and well-spoken, his comment on the distinction between a “black women” and a “sister” is lacking substance. Without insight to the full question and his full interview, it is not apparent to me what question he was addressing. However based on the limited response posted, his response indicates that he clearly has some inaccurate presumptions about black women.

    In addition he highlighted characteristics about a black woman that can be perceived as a level of prejudice and generalization about black women. Referencing having a younger educated and beautiful sister is irrelevant to the topic since his sister’s existence was not by his choice, hence having a younger sister does not justify and/or prove that he genuinely has an appreciation for black women as a whole. I wonder if he has levels of classification to describe and distinguish between “white/non-black women, or even a distinguish between a black-man and a bother?”

    To summarize, his comment suggests that he prefers women in general that have insecurities but can miraculously stay empowered (I wonder how insecure women stay empowed?). He appears to appreciate the physical swag and swing of a black woman – however that demonstrates security – which apparently is a negative since it means that she can not distinguish between a “sister” and a “black woman”, hence as a result according to Omari “she's searching for all the wrong things.”

    Omari, is an intelligent and talented person, however I think he may want to re-think his thoughts on this particular topic to better prepare himself to provide more detail and/or research evidence of such distinction between a “black woman and a sister.”


    ReplyDelete