Jul 28, 2010

 
 

NEW YORK—July 28, 2010—MSNBC and Ebony Magazine are partnering up in August to put education issues in the forefront of the nation's spotlight. Beginning August 9, MSNBC will feature twice-daily segments focusing on a variety of pertinent education issues, including the central challenges facing our public school systems today, the benefits of charter schools versus traditional public schools and how to improve the quality of our school systems on a national level.

The partnership will culminate in a two-hour education special, "Making The Grade," which will air on MSNBC on Sunday, August 15, beginning at noon ET. The special will ask the tough questions about the state of our nation's education systems and will celebrate education methods that have a proven track record of making a positive difference for students and educators. MSNBC anchor Tamron Hall will host the special discussion, which will include participation from actor/activist Hill Harper and other widely known figures in the Black community.

On Wednesday, August 11, Tamron Hall will moderate the Ebony Education Roundtable, an education summit hosted by the University of Chicago and Johnson Publishing Company. MSNBC will air portions of the roundtable discussion during "Making The Grade" on Sunday, and the full roundtable will be available for live viewing on Ebony.com. MSNBC.com, Ebony.com and TheGrio.com will also feature education-related editorial content on their respective sites.

MSNBC and Ebony's education partnership comes as a precursor to MSNBC's participation in Education Nation, a weeklong event beginning September 26th across all NBC News platforms.  Education Nation will include a two-day education summit and special in-depth coverage of education issues on NBC News, MSNBC, msnbc.com and the NBC stations.

"Education is the foundation upon which to build a better you, better communities and a better world for all of us," said Yvette Miley, Executive Editor of MSNBC. "We hope that MSNBC's participation will help move the conversation forward. We owe it to our children and ourselves."

2 comments:

  1. Much discipline is lacking in our public schools. I've been a public middle school teacher at the same Dallas middle school for a decade. Our children do not have it easy. 88% are living in poverty. Drugs, violence, and incarcerated parents and relatives are common. That makes it harder for any concerned teacher. How can we best improve education?

    Charter schools are helping the debate happen, and are hopefully helping the public to identify the issues they want solved in education. My concern is transparency. We must know what is going on is EVERY school to whom the honor is given of having our children entrusted to them, especially if that school is also funded with public money! Such transparency is sadly lacking on all sides, but Dallas ISD is getting better at it every year. If the multi-year enrollment by grade spreadsheet, complete with annual graduation numbers, is ever placed online by DISD, as was ordered by the Board about 6 months ago, we will have made significant progress. We will also be able to follow the dropout prevention progress that DISD is making year by year.

    It appears that this year, 2010, for the first time in over 15 years, DISD may have given out a large enough number of diplomas so that it will equal over 50% of the total 9th grade enrollment for 2006/2007, when most of those same student were in the 9th grade. We will have broken a 50% graduation rate by this measurement! I wrote about that goal in March of 2009 (http://www.studentmotivation.org/DallasISDGoal.htm) never imagining that we could possibly reach it as quickly as the Class of 2010. DISD is making real progress!

    In 2005 our inner-city middle school in Dallas started the School Archive Project. It is the 10-year time-capsule and 10-year class reunion/mentoring project that is now being installed in a 6th DISD school.

    From 2000 to 2007, Sunset High School, which received the majority of the School Archive Project students, had an average graduation rate of 34%. In 2009 the first class with School Archive Project students graduated giving Sunset a 49% graduation rate for the entire class! That was the highest graduation rate in over 15 years! Then this year, for the Class of 2010, the Sunset graduation rate jumped to 60%! Due to what it has been seeing, last year Sunset staff started their own, high school level, Archive Project. The other middle school feeding into Sunset also started a School Archive Project last year.

    If the Archive Project and its focus on the future has had any role in this lowering of the dropout rate and the rise of the graduation rate, it is safe to project that the Sunset graduation rate will be going above 70% within the next 4 years!

    Students must want to stay in school for the right reasons, not because the classroom is an effective detention facility! The Archive Project focuses students onto their own futures in as concrete and physical a way as is possible. Students appear to then be better envisioning the value of education. Along the way it appears teen pregnancy rates are going down. I personally think gang involvement is also going down slowly. Students are beginning to value themselves, their families, and their futures more.

    At a cost that is less than $2 per child per year, this is a project all schools should have. It only requires one dedicated teacher to volunteer as project manager who would also love to see their students again in 10 years at the reunion.

    This project is free for any school to use, and there are four $1,500 grants still available at the Dallas Educational Foundation for DISD schools who want to start such projects. It is only requested that any schools using the Archive Project share any improvements they may develop so we can all continue to improve.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Much discipline is lacking in our public schools. I've been a public middle school teacher at the same Dallas middle school for a decade. Our children do not have it easy. 88% are living in poverty. Drugs, violence, and incarcerated parents and relatives are common. That makes it harder for any concerned teacher. How can we best improve education?

    Charter schools are helping the debate happen, and are hopefully helping the public to identify the issues they want solved in education. My concern is transparency. We must know what is going on is EVERY school to whom the honor is given of having our children entrusted to them, especially if that school is also funded with public money! Such transparency is sadly lacking on all sides, but Dallas ISD is getting better at it every year. If the multi-year enrollment by grade spreadsheet, complete with annual graduation numbers, is ever placed online by DISD, as was ordered by the Board about 6 months ago, we will have made significant progress. We will also be able to follow the dropout prevention progress that DISD is making year by year.

    It appears that this year, 2010, for the first time in over 15 years, DISD may have given out a large enough number of diplomas so that it will equal over 50% of the total 9th grade enrollment for 2006/2007, when most of those same student were in the 9th grade. We will have broken a 50% graduation rate by this measurement! I wrote about that goal in March of 2009 (http://www.studentmotivation.org/DallasISDGoal.htm) never imagining that we could possibly reach it as quickly as the Class of 2010. DISD is making real progress!

    In 2005 our inner-city middle school in Dallas started the School Archive Project. It is the 10-year time-capsule and 10-year class reunion/mentoring project that is now being installed in a 6th DISD school.

    From 2000 to 2007, Sunset High School, which received the majority of the School Archive Project students, had an average graduation rate of 34%. In 2009 the first class with School Archive Project students graduated giving Sunset a 49% graduation rate for the entire class! That was the highest graduation rate in over 15 years! Then this year, for the Class of 2010, the Sunset graduation rate jumped to 60%! Due to what it has been seeing, last year Sunset staff started their own, high school level, Archive Project. The other middle school feeding into Sunset also started a School Archive Project last year.

    If the Archive Project and its focus on the future has had any role in this lowering of the dropout rate and the rise of the graduation rate, it is safe to project that the Sunset graduation rate will be going above 70% within the next 4 years!

    Students must want to stay in school for the right reasons, not because the classroom is an effective detention facility! The Archive Project focuses students onto their own futures in as concrete and physical a way as is possible. Students appear to then be better envisioning the value of education. Along the way it appears teen pregnancy rates are going down. I personally think gang involvement is also going down slowly. Students are beginning to value themselves, their families, and their futures more.

    At a cost that is less than $2 per child per year, this is a project all schools should have. It only requires one dedicated teacher to volunteer as project manager who would also love to see their students again in 10 years at the reunion.

    This project is free for any school to use, and there are four $1,500 grants still available at the Dallas Educational Foundation for DISD schools who want to start such projects. It is only requested that any schools using the Archive Project share any improvements they may develop so we can all continue to improve.

    ReplyDelete